September302014

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:

Some Assembly Required: The Not-So-Secret Life of a Transgender Teen by Arin Andrews (Simon & Schuster)

“In a plainspoken and sometimes-humorous memoir, transgender teenager Andrews discusses his life so far. Andrews received national recognition when he was profiled on television’s Inside Edition as one half of a transgender teen couple (the other half, Katie Rain Hill, has written her own memoir, Rethinking Normal). In a conversational tone, the author describes events from his childhood and teen years. … Friendly and informative.” — Kirkus

Boy Trouble by ReShonda Tate Billingsley (K-Teen)

Book Description: Maya’s best friend Kennedi has flipped head over heels for her new boo, Kendrick. But when Maya learns Kennedi and Kendrick’s relationship is full of violence—and Kennedi is the aggressor—will she get her best friend to see love shouldn’t hurt? Meanwhile, Sheridan has found love too, but her Prince Charming isn’t all that he seems, and Sheridan won’t listen to anything her friends try to tell her. Maya is trying to navigate all of that while dealing with her own family drama as her parents go through a nasty divorce. How is a diva supposed to stay sane when everything around her is falling apart?

Rethinking Normal: A Memoir in Transition by Katie Rain Hill (Simon & Schuster)

“Katie knew she was a girl on the inside, even when she was a suicidal kid named Luke growing up in a disjointed family in Oklahoma. Bullied relentlessly at school and unsupported by administrators, other students’ parents, and even her own father, Katie finds an ally in her mother, who stands by her child as she starts dressing like a girl, legally changes her name, and travels to get genital reconstruction surgery the day after turning 18. … Being so open—and openly imperfect—makes Katie relatable on a human level, not just as a spokesperson.” — Publishers Weekly

Love Is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson (Arthur A. Levine Books)

“Lost memories, a deadly pandemic flu and the children of D.C.’s elite come together in this sophisticated bio-thriller. … Johnson, who astounded with her cyberpunk teen debut, The Summer Prince (2013), immerses readers in the complexities of Bird’s world, especially her fraught relationship with her parents and the intersections of race and class at her elite prep school. The often lyrical third-person, present-tense narration, the compelling romance and the richly developed cast of characters elevate this novel far above more formulaic suspense fare. Utterly absorbing.” — Kirkus, starred review

Pig Park by Claudia Guadalupe Martinez (Cinco Puntos)

“Residents of a declining neighborhood band together to turn their economy around by building a tourist attraction. Masi spent her life working in her family’s bakery in Pig Park, so named for the lard company that, until outsourcing, provided most of the area’s jobs. The multiethnic Chicago neighborhood agrees to the outlandish scheme of building a ‘Gran Pirámide’ in their park, as a famous community developer suggests. … The story of a community working together is uplifting.” — Kirkus

The Only Thing to Fear by Caroline Tung Richmond (Scholastic)

“That 20th-century speculative-fiction staple, the what-if-Hitler-won-the-war alternate history, meets 21st-century special-girl dystopia. It’s been almost a century since the Axis powers divided a conquered North America among them: Japan in the west, Germany in the east, and Italy in the Dakotas. In the Nazi-controlled Shenandoah Valley, 16-year-old half-Japanese Zara is an Untermensch, a half-breed fit only for scut work. Though she works all hours as both a janitor and a farm girl, Zara desperately wants Uncle Red to allow her to join the Revolutionary Alliance, the anti-Nazi underground. … Overall, a satisfying and appropriately hectic action adventure.” — Kirkus

Schizo: A novel by Nic Sheff (Philomel)

“Sheff’s novel reveals the painful and confusing world of teenage schizophrenia through the experience of Miles, a junior at a small San Francisco private school. … Readers fascinated by the dark side of the human mind in realistic fiction will enjoy this deft portrayal of a brain and a life spiraling out of control. Miles is an endearing character whose difficult journey will generate compassion and hope.” — School Library Journal

Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley (Harlequin Teen)

“Sarah Dunbar, a black high school senior in the graduating class of 1959, is nervous about entering the formerly all-white Jefferson High School with nine of her black classmates. … The big issues of school desegregation in the 1950s, interracial dating, and same-sex couples have the potential to be too much for one novel, but the author handles all with aplomb. What makes it even better is that both Linda’s and Sarah’s points of view are revealed as the novel unfolds, giving meaning to their indoctrinated views. Educators looking for materials to support the civil rights movement will find a gem in this novel, and librarians seeking titles for their LGBT displays should have this novel on hand.” — VOYA

Beauty of the Broken by Tawni Waters (Simon Pulse)

“Mara Stonebrook knows she does not belong; she is ”different.“ Her small town is conservative and strictly religious. … Mara has managed to escape her father’s abuse for 15 years, but she knows that if anyone finds out her deepest secret, that she is a lesbian, she will be punished as an abomination in the eyes of their conservative church. If her father finds out, she will be lucky to live. Keeping her secret is easy until Xylia comes to town. … Emotionally wrenching, this novel will resonate with students struggling with their own sexual orientation.” — School Library Journal

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer (Dutton)

“When 10th grader Jam Gallahue meets British exchange student Reeve Maxfield, she fees like she finally understands love, and when she loses him, she can’t get over it. Her grief eventually lands her at the Wooden Barn, a therapeutic boarding school for “emotionally fragile, highly intelligent” teenagers. … Making her YA debut, acclaimed author Wolitzer writes crisply and sometimes humorously about sadness, guilt, and anger.” — Publishers Weekly, starred review

4PM
4PM
penguinteen:


Brown Girl Dreaming | Jacqueline Woodson

penguinteen:

Brown Girl Dreaming | Jacqueline Woodson

(via reblogbookclub)

10AM

yainterrobang:

NEW RELEASES: SEPTEMBER 30
Here’s a selection of some of the new YA novels hitting the shelves this week (September 30 - October 6). For more on new releases and all things YA lit, visit our website, follow us here and on Twitter, and subscribe to our biweekly newsletter!

Beauty of the Broken by Tawni Waters
Publisher: Simon Pulse
Release date: September 30th
Mara finds escape from her close-minded parents with her classmate Xylia. The closer Mara and Xylia become, the more Mara feels for her. Just as Mara begins to live a life she’s only imagined, the girls’ secret is threatened with exposure.

Belzhar by Meg Wolitzer
Publisher: Dutton
Release date: September 30th
If life were fair, Jam Gallahue would still with her boyfriend, but Reeve is dead. When an assignment leads Jam to Belzhar, Jam can feel Reeve’s arms around her again. But there are hidden truths on Jam’s path to reclaim her loss.

Complete Nothing (True Love #2) by Kieran Scott
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 30th
Banished from Mount Olympus and tasked with helping couples find love without using her powers, the goddess-formerly-known-as-Cupid is having a tough time. Especially now that True’s immortal love, Orion, has no memory of her.

Dead Zone (Blackout #2) by Robison Wells
Publisher: HarperTeen
Release date: September 30th
America is at war—and five teens are caught in the crossfire. It began with a virus. Then a series of attacks erupted across the nation. Now the true invasion has begun, and a handful of teenagers with powers are America’s only defense.

Famous Last Words by Katie Alender
Publisher: Point
Release date: September 30th
Willa is seeing things. A dead body in her swimming pool. Frantic messages on her walls. It’s as if someone is trying to send a message. Meanwhile, a killer reenacts movie murder scenes. Could Willa’s visions have to do with these murders?

The Fine Art of Pretending (The Fine Art of Pretending #1) by Rachel Harris
Publisher: Spencer Hill Press
Release date: September 30th
Aly devises a plan to shed her tomboy image with the help of best friend Brandon, now Aly’s pretend boyfriend. But the inevitable “break up” leaves their friendship in shambles, and Aly and Brandon with feelings they can’t explain.

Invisible (The Twixt #2) by Dawn Metcalf
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Release date: September 30th
Joy Malone wants it all—power, freedom and the boyfriend who loves her. Yet when an unstoppable assassin is hired to kill her, Joy learns that being the girl with the Sight comes with a price that might be too high to pay.

Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Release date: September 30th
Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend Jefferson High School. Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s opponents of integration. Forced to work together, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.

Love Is the Drug by Alaya Dawn Johnson
Publisher: Arthur A. Levine Books
Release date: September 30th
A deadly flu virus is sweeping the nation. Homeland security agent Roosevelt David is certain that Emily Bird knows something about the virus. But Bird wakes in a hospital, days after meeting Roosevelt, with no memory of the night.

My Brother’s Keeper by Tom Bradman & Tony Bradman
Publisher: Bloomsbury Children’s Books
Release date: September 30th
Alfie signs up for the army aged just 15, carried away by patriotic fervour at the start of the Great War. But when he volunteers for a raid on the German trenches, Alfie begins to understand what war means, and to see the value of the lives thrown away on the Western Front every day.

The Only Thing to Fear by Caroline Tung Richmond
Publisher: Scholastic Press
Release date: September 30th
It’s been nearly 80 years since the Allies lost WWII against Hitler’s genetically engineered soldiers. 16-year-old Zara might hold the key to rebellion, something she’s spent her entire life hiding, under threat of immediate execution.

Party Games by R.L. Stine
Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin
Release date: September 30th
Her friends warn her not to go to Brendan Fear’s birthday party. Rachel Martin has a crush on Brendan and is excited to be invited. But one game no one planned intrudes on his party—the game of murder.

The Queen of Zombie Hearts (The White Rabbit Chronicles #3) by Gena Showalter
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Release date: September 30th
Alice “Ali” Bell thinks the worst is behind her. Until Anima Industries, the agency controlling the zombies, launches a sneak attack, killing four of her friends.

Sacrifice (Elemental #5) by Brigid Kemmerer
Publisher: Kensington Teen
Release date: September 30th
Michael Merrick understands pressure. His power to control Earth could kill someone if he miscalculates. Now an Elemental Guide has it in for his family, and he’s all that stands in the way.

Schizo by Nic Sheff
Publisher: Philomel
Release date: September 30th
Miles’s little brother Teddy is missing. The police believe he drowned at the beach—the very same day Miles had his first schizophrenic episode. But Miles knows better—Teddy is alive. Fuelled by guilt, Miles sets off to rescue Teddy.

Unmarked (The Legion #2) by Kami Garcia
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 30th
Kennedy Waters lives in a world in which vengeance spirits kill, ghosts keep secrets, and a demon walks among us - a demon that she accidentally set free. Now Kennedy and the other Legion members have to hunt him down.

Winterspell by Claire Legrand
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Books for Young Readers
Release date: September 30th
After her mother is brutally murdered, seventeen-year-old Clara Stole is determined to find out what happened to her. Her father, a powerful man with little integrity, isn’t much help.

Witchrise (The Tudor Witch Trilogy #3) by Victoria Lamb
Publisher: Harlequin Teen
Release date: September 30th
When Tudor witch Meg Lytton receives an unexpected legacy—her mother’s magical wand, ring and spellbook—she has no idea her future happiness is in danger. For the witchfinder Marcus Dent is back in her dreams, and he will use any weapon to gain her newfound powers for himself.

Cooper Bartholomew is Dead by Rebecca James
Publisher: Allen & Unwin
Release date: October 1st
Why and how did Cooper Bartholomew die? As Cooper’s girlfriend, Libby, searches for answers, and probes more deeply into what really happened the day Cooper died, she and her friends unravel a web of deception and betrayal.

The Gatekeeper’s Son (The Gatekeeper’s Son #1) by C.R. Fladmark
Publisher: The Shokunin Publishing Company
Release date: October 1st
Junya’s grandfather is a billionaire who keeps the secret to his success hidden in a heavily guarded safe. His mother is a martial artist who wields a razor-sharp katana—and seems to read his mind. And a mysterious girl can knock him over with just a look. What do they know that he doesn’t?

Girl On a Wire by Gwenda Bond
Publisher: Skyscape
Release date: October 1st
Sixteen-year-old Jules Maroni’s dream is to follow in her father’s footsteps as a high-wire walker. But the presence of the Flying Garcias may derail her plans. For decades, the two rival families have avoided each other as sworn enemies.

Perfectly Good White Boy by Carrie Mesrobian
Publisher: Carolrhoda Lab
Release date: October 1st
Sean is sure he’s seen his future and its “possibilities”. The only hopeful possibilities in Sean’s life are the Marine Corps, where no one expected he’d go, and Neecie Albertson, whom he never expected to care about.

Summer’s Shadow by Anna Wilson
Publisher: Pan MacMillan
Release date: October 1st
Forced to leave her life in London, Summer moves to Tristan’s creepy, ancient house in Cornwall. There she is met with indifference and open hostility. Soon Summer comes to believe that the house may be haunted.

Frozen (Heart of Dread #1) by Melissa de la Cruz & Michael Johnston
Publisher: Orchard Books
Release date: October 2nd
Natasha Kestal is a young blackjack dealer looking for a way out. Like many, she’s heard of a mythical land called “the Blue.” It’s a place where Nat won’t be persecuted, even if her darkest secret comes to light.

Misty Falls by Joss Stirling
Publisher: Oxford University Press
Release date: October 2nd
Misty is a one-girl disaster zone. Born with a Savant ‘gift’ that means she can never tell a lie, her compulsive truth-telling gets her into trouble wherever she goes. So when she meets Alex, Misty resolves to keep her distance…

Rock War (Rock War #1) by Robert Muchamore
Publisher: Hodder & Stoughton
Release date: October 2nd
Jay plays guitar, writes songs and dreams of being a rock star. Summer works hard at school, looks after her nan and has a one-in-a-million singing voice. Dylan reluctantly joins a band to avoid crunching tackles and icy mud. They’re about to enter the biggest battle of their lives.

A Song for Ella Grey by David Almond
Publisher: Hodder Children’s Books
Release date: October 2nd
Claire is Ella Grey’s best friend. She witnesses a love so dramatic it is as if her best friend has been captured and taken from her. But the loss of her friend to the arms of Orpheus is nothing compared to the loss she feels when Ella is taken from the world.

The Ghosts of Heaven by Marcus Sedgwick
Publisher: Orion Books
Release date: October 3rd
The spiral has existed as long as time has existed. It’s there hiding the treacherous waters of Golden Beck that take Anna, who they call a witch. On the other side of the world as a poet watches the waves and knows the horrors the hide, and far into the future as Keir Bowman realises his destiny.

Lies We Tell Ourselves by Robin Talley
Publisher: MIRA Ink
Release date: October 3rd
Sarah Dunbar is one of the first black students to attend Jefferson High School. Linda Hairston is the daughter of one of the town’s opponents of integration. Forced to work together, Sarah and Linda must confront harsh truths about race, power and how they really feel about one another.

Charming by Krystal Wade
Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press
Release date: October 6th
Sixteen-year-old Haley Tremaine had it all: top-notch school, fantastic family, and a bright future, but all of that changed when an accident tore her family apart. Now, a cold headstone bearing her mother’s name is all she has left.

The Paris Mysteries (Confessions #3) by James Patterson & Maxine Paetro
Publisher: Little, Brown Books for Young Readers
Release date: October 6th
After investigating her family’s decades-old skeletons in the closet, Tandy Angel is finally reunited with her lost love in Paris. But as he grows increasingly distant, Tandy is confronted with disturbing questions about him.

Wicked Path (Daath Chronicles #2) by Eliza Tilton
Publisher: Curiosity Quills Press
Release date: October 6th
Avikar still can’t remember his battle with Lucino. On the hunt for answers, he returns to the scene of the fight and discovers a strange connection between his family’s dagger and the mysterious kingdom of Daath.

September292014
teendotcom:

#nowplaying: Lorde’s “Yellow Flicker Beat” from the soundtrack to The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 1. 
Listen here!

teendotcom:

#nowplaying: Lorde’s “Yellow Flicker Beat” from the soundtrack to The Hunger Games: Mockingjay — Part 1

Listen here!

September272014

librarylydia:

Today’s Award of Excellence in Library Signage goes to the Carnegie Stout Public Library in Dubuque Iowa.

(Photo credit goes to their Facebook page)

(via bookpatrol)

September252014
bookoisseur:

rachaelknocksallthetime:

staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.
The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.
Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.
So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

DO IT

No really.Do it.

bookoisseur:

rachaelknocksallthetime:

staff:

Happy National Voter Registration Day, Tumblr.

The number one way of celebrating it? Registering to vote.

Every year, millions of eligible Americans neglect to register, which means that millions of important voices are utterly silent on Election Day. Don’t be one of them. There’s basically a 100% chance that something you care about is on the ballot, something you don’t want to be quiet about.

So be one of the loud ones. Register already. It’s an easy form that you already know all the answers to. No excuses.

DO IT

No really.

Do it.

(via yahighway)

11PM

darienlibrary:

quirkbooks:

Banned Books Week kicks off next week, and we want you to be ready! Here are a week of outfits inspired by banned books, created by Kristy Pirone!

All the details regarding the outfits can be found on the Quirk blog, here

Now go get dressed, and celebrate banned books! 

v cool idea would reblog again

(via yahighway)

September242014

365days-of-balloons:

Day 365: Up, Up & Away (Part 2: Photo Story)

365 Iconic Balloon Dogs made out of 365 Days worth of left over balloon scraps. Photos by myself and Katie Riccardella

2PM

diversityinya:

This week’s diverse new releases are:

Dreaming in Indian edited by Lisa Charleyboy and Mary Beth Leatherdale (Annick Press)

Book Description: A powerful and visually stunning anthology from some of the most groundbreaking Native artists working in North America today.

Truly universal in its themes, Dreaming In Indian will shatter commonly held stereotypes and challenge readers to rethink their own place in the world. Divided into four sections, ‘Roots,’ ‘Battles,’ ‘Medicines,’ and ‘Dreamcatchers,’ this book offers readers a unique insight into a community often misunderstood and misrepresented by the mainstream media.

Adrenaline Crush by Laurie Boyle Crompton (Farrar Straus & Giroux)

Book Description: Seventeen-year-old Dyna comes from a long line of risk-takers and is an avid thrill-seeker in her own right, until she takes a terrible fall and shatters her leg. Her life used to be about bike racing and rock climbing; now it’s about staying home, except for attending physical and group therapy sessions at the bizarre alternative healing center her mom has chosen. Dyna’s boyfriend saw her accident and supports her newfound desire for safety, but a young Iraq war veteran she meets at rehab challenges her to think about what she’s really avoiding in her old life and to take chances again—even with her heart.

Silvern by Christina Farley (Skyscape)

Book Description: Jae Hwa Lee is ready to forget about immortals and move on with her life. Until the god of darkness, Kud, sends an assassin to kill her. She escapes with the knowledge that Kud is seeking the lost White Tiger Orb, and joins the Guardians of Shinshi to seek out the orb before Kud can find it. But Kud is a stronger and more devious god than Jae ever imagined. Jae is soon painfully reminded that by making an enemy of Kud, she has placed her closest friends in danger, and must decide how much she can bear to sacrifice to defeat one of the most powerful immortals in all of Korea.

Salt & Storm by Kendall Kulper (Little, Brown)

Book Description: Sixteen-year-old Avery Roe wants only to take her rightful place as the witch of Prince Island, making the charms that keep the island’s whalers safe at sea, but her mother has forced her into a magic-free world of proper manners and respectability. When Avery dreams she’s to be murdered, she knows time is running out to unlock her magic and save herself.

Avery finds an unexpected ally in a tattooed harpoon boy named Tane—a sailor with magic of his own, who moves Avery in ways she never expected. Becoming a witch might stop her murder and save her island from ruin, but Avery discovers her magic requires a sacrifice she never prepared for.

Tabula Rasa by Kristen Lippert-Martin (Egmont USA)

“Lippert-Martin’s debut finds life in the oft-seen trope of lost memory—and even a somewhat plausible mechanism for bringing about the amnesia. Plausibility isn’t always the name of the game (the government rarely uses world-class architects for medical torture labs), but this is a very entertaining game for thriller fans. Sarah Ramos, 16, is undergoing focused memory-elimination treatments when her surgery is interrupted by a power outage, followed by an invasion of explosives-wielding commandos who are looking for her.” — Publishers Weekly

On a Clear Day by Walter Dean Myers (Crown Books for Young Readers)

“Myers issues a rebellious call to action that chronicles how seven diverse teenagers respond to injustice in a globalized not-so-distant future. In 2035, giant multinationals control the world’s major resources, engineering positive economic growth by exploiting worldwide social inequity. Change-embracing Dominican computer whiz and Bronx native Dahlia Grillo, the narrator, is one of seven teens who resist. … Readers are left to question what actions are possible, what actions are needed and what actions are right in a world where inaction is an impossibility.A clarion call from a beloved, much-missed master.” — Kirkus, starred review

Unmade (The Lynburn Legacy Book 3) by Sarah Rees Brennan (Random House Books for Young Readers)

Book Description: Kami has lost the boy she loves, is tied to a boy she does not, and faces an enemy more powerful than ever before. With Jared missing for months and presumed dead, Kami must rely on her new magical link with Ash for the strength to face the evil spreading through her town.

Rob Lynburn is now the master of Sorry-in-the-Vale, and he demands a death. Kami will use every tool at her disposal to stop him. Together with Rusty, Angela, and Holly, she uncovers a secret that might be the key to saving the town. But with knowledge comes responsibility—and a painful choice. A choice that will risk not only Kami’s life, but also the lives of those she loves most.

Afterworlds by Scott Westerfeld (Simon Pulse)

“Eighteen-year-old Darcy drops her college plans and moves to New York to revise her soon-to-bepublished novel and start the second one. Meanwhile, in chapters that alternate with Darcy’s NYC adventures, her fictional protagonist, Lizzie, survives a near-death experience to find she has become a psychopomp, responsible for guiding souls to the afterlife. Westerfeld masterfully creates two divergent reading experiences (YA romance and fantasy horror) with two distinct yet believable voices. … this is a busy book, with content drawn from Gujarati culture and Indian religion—this book includes romantic entanglements, a charming lesbian love story, terrorism and justice, and insider references to the YA publishing and literature scene.” — Booklist, starred review

(via weneeddiversebooks)

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